William “Bobby” Hanson

for Congress — Arkansas' 4th District

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Working Together – Winning the Future

Many of the social and economic issues we face, such as poverty, the environment, economic inequality, and education are interdependent and occur across socieoeconomic, ethnic, generational and jurisdictional boundaries.

Communities and organizations acting alone often lack the capacity to develop and implement sustainable solutions. Since increasing levels of knowledge and cooperation are needed to address complex social and economic issues, communities need constructive ways for diverse groups to work together on common problems.

I believe in the power and promise of collaboration. By collaboration, I mean that we have to be willing to share the risks and rewards that come with any policy decision if we want to achieve a common goal. Working together is the only road to winning the future for Arkansas and Arkansans.

In Arkansas, we deserve leadership that is independent and courageous enough to speak the truth about the needs of our state and the nation.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. said – “A man dies when he refuses to stand up for that which is right. A man dies when he refuses to stand up for justice.  A man dies when he refuses to stand up for that which is true.” 

In this time of so much divisiveness in our politics, we need leadership that is willing and able to reach across party, generational, racial, and economic lines to find solutions to the problems that confront us. 

“ I believe in the power and promise of collaboration. Working together is the only road to winning the future for Arkansas and Arkansans.”

My roots in the 4th Congressional District go back over 150 years

An 1867 voter list for Ouachita County contains the names of my great-grandfather, my great-great grandfather, and my great-great-great grandfather.  My family has resided continuously in Ouachita county since before the Civil War. I was born in Camden, Arkansas and grew up in Buena Vista on the outskirts of town. I attended Stephens High School in Stephens, Arkansas, and after graduation, I enrolled in the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville for a short time before volunteering for the U.S. Army. After an honorable discharge, I attended Henderson State University in Arkadelphia for one semester before leaving for California where I began working for a community-based organization providing readjustment support for Vietnam-era veterans.

It was my work as a veterans’ advocate that led me to study law and public policy as tools for improving our communities. Consequently, I completed a degree in political economy from the University of California at Berkeley in 1985 and a law degree from Columbia University School of Law in 1988.  Since that time, I have spent my career practicing and teaching law, primarily, in the areas of civil rights, political science, and criminal justice.

I live in Hot Springs, Arkansas with my wife of thirty-three years, Zaretta Hammond, an educator and author of Culturally Responsive Teaching and the Brain.  We have two children (now young adults)– our son Morgan, who resides in Little Rock, and our daughter, Zindzi who lives in California.

William and Zaretta